Changes to the eviction process

Protect renters from eviction

Emergency legislation to handle the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has brought about changes to the eviction process of all tenants (social and private). The government strongly advise landlords not to commence or continue possession proceedings during this challenging time without a very good reason to do so. It is essential that we work together during these unprecedented times to keep each other safe. The changes that the government have brought in mean that should a landlord absolutely need to evict a tenant, they must:

  • Have given their tenant three months notice (if served between 26 March 2020 and 28 August 2020)
  • Give or have given their tenant at least six months notice if served on or after 29 August 2020

The notice period can be shorter in some cases, for example, if you are evicting a tenant for anti-social behaviour. For further information, please visit:

In order to serve notice a landlord must still satisfy the courts that they have done everything correctly as you would have been required to do prior to the coronavirus outbreak. Landlords are reminded there are likely to be delays in cases being heard by courts and that:

  • Only a court appointed bailiff can ever physically evict anyone from their home
  • Possession must be sought in a lawful way, ensuring that at all times tenants are not harassed to end their tenancy or be illegally evicted
  • Tenants must be allowed quiet and peaceful enjoyment of their homes

Where these are flouted the council shall thoroughly investigate these matters and bring all such criminal actions before the courts.

Last updated: ‎05‎/‎10‎/‎2020‎ ‎11‎:‎50‎